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Dr Tilahun Nigatu Haregu

BSc (Public Health) | MPH (Epidemiology) | PhD, Monash University

Dr Tilahun Nigatu Haregu

Implementation Science

Research Fellow

0413 661 418

Dr Tilahun Nigatu Haregu is a Research Fellow in the Implementation Science lab. He manages international projects that focus on cardiometabolic diseases. He has been working as Research Fellow on non-communicable disease and mental health research at Nossal Institute for Global Health, University of Melbourne since 2019. Prior to that he worked as Research officer/Data analyst for MOVE study at Monash University. He obtained his PhD in Public Health from Monash University in 2014. After completing his PhD, he joined the African Population and Health Center as a postdoctoral fellow and later he was promoted to Associate Research Scientist. Tilahun has advanced skills in global health research, big data management and analysis including data linkage.

Tilahun spent over four years working for United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF) on Program Monitoring/Evaluation, Health Systems Research, Quality assurance and Strategic information. He has authored over 50 peer-reviewed articles in different areas of public health, including those in the lancet. Tilahun’s research interests include, but are not limited to, the interplay between non-communicable diseases and infectious diseases, measurement of comorbidities and multimorbidities, acculturation and health, and translation of research knowledge to practice.

Achievements

  • APHRC Postdoctoral Fellowship (2014–2016)
  • Monash University Graduate Studies Scholarship (2011–2014)
  • Monash University International Postgraduate Research Scholarship (2011–2014)
  • World Public Health Congress Travel Grant, World Federation of Public Health (2012)

Publication highlights

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